News and Events

 


Go
 
  Register For Events | Guest Book | Sitemap
Past Events
Year of 2002

1. Leadership Conference 2002

2. Survey of Chinese Newspaper

3. Zhe Zheng Funeral Service
 
------------------------AHHEC/AAARI 2002 Retreat
------------------------AAARI Open House - Mar 2002
------------------------Meeting Minutes


AAARI Photo Album!

 


 

Asian American


Please click below:

Leadership

 Conference:

 

Healing & Rebuilding

 

New York
 

Date: Friday, May 10, 2002



Time:
8:30 AM To 4:45 PM

 

Survey of Chinese Newspapers in Selected Areas

By: Anna Lai

Ethnic newspapers play an important role within the immigrant communities in New York. Their contribution to the healing and rebuilding of New York since 9/11 is generally recognized. In an attempt to measure their impact on one of the Asian communities, a survey was conducted by Ms. Ana Lai, of the Asian American / Asian Research Institute, to assess the sales volume of the four popular Chinese language daily newspapers.

The survey covered only selected areas in Manhattan and in Brooklyn.  A large area in Flushing, Queens was omitted.  

Areas covered in Manhattan include: Allen St., Bayard St., Bowery St., Grand St., Hester St., Pell St., Canal St., Centre St., Baxter St., Eldridge St., Lafayette St., Catherine St., East Broadway., Henry St., Madison St., Chrystie St., Delancey St., Ludlow St., Division St., Rutgers St., Elizabeth St., Forsyth St., Saint James Place., Mott St., Mulberry St., and Oliver St.

Areas covered in Brooklyn include: 7th Avenue, 8th Avenue, Fort Hamilton Parkway, and Avenue U.

The survey was conducted on selected dates in the months of June, July and August, 2002.  95 businesses were interviewed in Manhattan (with 17 no responses), and 46 businesses were interviewed in Brooklyn (with 3 no responses).  The tabulation showed that Sing Tao Daily clearly led the others in the sales volume in selected areas of the two Chinese neighborhoods in Manhattan and in Brooklyn.

Survey Findings

In Manhattan:

1. Sing Tao Daily sells approximately 9, 260 copies per day during weekdays and 11, 405 per day during weekends. A business may sell Sing Tao up to 700 copies on a business day and up to 2, 500 on a weekend.

2. World Journal sells approximately 4, 202 copies per day during weekdays and 4, 874 copies per day during weekends. A business may sell World Journal up to 200 copies per day during weekdays and 700 copies during a weekend.

3. Ming Pao Daily sells approximately 2, 626 copies per day during weekdays and 3, 741 per day during weekends. A business may sell Ming Pao up to 200 copies per day during weekdays and 500 copies per day on a weekend.

4. China Press sells approximately 1, 603 copies per day during weekdays and 1, 986 per day during weekends. A business may sell China Press up to 120 copies during weekdays and 350 copies on a weekend.

In Brooklyn:

1. Sing Tao Daily sells approximately 2, 722 copies per day during weekdays and 2, 747 per day during weekends. A business may sell Sing Tao up to 280 copies daily (weekdays and weekends).

2. World Journal sells approximately 1, 201 copies per day during weekdays and 1, 236 copies per day during weekends. A business may sell World Journal up to 200 copies daily (weekdays and weekends).

3. Ming Pao Daily sells approximately 949 copies per day during weekdays and 1, 594 per day during weekends. A business may sell Ming Pao up to 120 copies per day during weekdays and 200 copies per day on a weekend.

4. China Press sells approximately 576 copies per day during business day and 574 copies per day during weekends. A business may sell China Press up to 100 copies daily (weekdays and weekends).

The survey indicated that the more businesses sell newspapers in one area, the less newspapers are being sold in each business. In Mott Street, Sing Tao Daily, for instance, can only be sold up to 200 copies (weekday) and 120 copies (weekend) because there are 10 locations that are almost next to each other. In Catherine Street, on the other hand, there are only 6 locations that sell newspapers, and each of them is approximately two blocks away from each other. Hence, Sing Tao Daily can be sold up to 400 copies daily (weekdays & weekends).

Sales Volume (daily)

 

Brooklyn

Manhattan

 

Weekday

Weekend

Weekday

Weekend

Sing Tao Daily

2, 722 2, 747 9, 290 11, 405

World Journal

1, 201 1, 236 4, 202 4, 874

Ming Pao Daily

949 1, 594 2, 626 3, 741

China Press

576 574 1, 603 1, 986

 

Go Back Up

 

Chinatown Funeral Service for
Zhe (Zack) Zeng

September 9th, 2002

[Photos by Antony Wong]

You Will Always Be My Hero

Life is precious, but the human spirit is divine.

A man's soul gives his life meaning.  It makes life sparkle, filling his world with energy and hope.

A year ago, on 9/11, when thousands of victims tried to escape from the attack on the World Trade Center, there was one man who seemed fearless and rushed into the disaster site without hesitation.  His name was Zack Zeng.  We can still see him saving others courageously in the videotape today.  When the second tower collapsed, he never made it back.  The scene of Zack Zeng's heroic action showed us the highest level of humanity - selflessness and sacrifice.  What could be nobler than the spirit of being willing to give one's own life in order to save others?  Zack is not only the pride of all Chinese but also all American.

The spirit of compassion and sacrifice is the power behind this simple, ordinary, and real man toward his heroism.  Zack became the paragon of Chinese immigration history.  His name will remain in everyone's heart forever.

As survivors of the 9/11 tragedy, when we look back to Zack's courage and bravery we should ask ourselves how we value our lives and how we can learn to treasure every day.  To pursue meaning and value in life is the highest virtue of humanity.  We should strive to improve ourselves everyday.  Only then is life precious and meaningful.  An enlightened and content man feels no regrets when he reaches the end of his life.

As we go alone reading this booklet, following the footsteps of Zack's short but meaningful life, we'll understand more about him.  We should take upon this opportunity to reflect on life.  A hero is not created in a moment, but by the accumulation of action over the course of a human life.

Zack Zeng, you will always be my hero.

 

---[from "In Memory of Zhe (Zack) Zeng", a booklet distributed at the funeral]

 

 


Almost a year after the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Center, the spirit of Zhe Zeng, a Chinese American who died helping those in need at Ground Zero, was finally laid to rest in a funeral service honoring his sacrifice.

 


Held at Ng Fook Funeral Service on Mulberry Street, across from Columbus Park, the service was attended by many leaders from the Asian American community, who crowded the tiny funeral hall in order to pay their respects to Zhe Zeng. 

 


Amidst the camera flashes of swarming reporters, Zhe Zeng's mother, brother and sister sat solemnly as well-wishers sent their condolences.  Mr. Ting Dan Wu, Chairman of the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, indicated that a street in Ground Zero should be named after Zhe Zeng to commemorate his heroism. 

 


Zeng's mother felt proud of his son's sacrifice.  She said: "He would not have regretted about his choice.  In the past year, I thought of him everyday.  I faced reality too.  I am studying English.  It was something that Zhe always wanted me to do.  I will struggle to keep on living."

 


Presenting the Zeng family with a proclamation by the City of New York for Zhe Zeng's bravery was Councilman John C. Liu of Queens.  The plaque was later placed on top of Zhe Zeng's closed casket for all to view. 

 


The dignitaries attended the funeral included  Mr. Zhang Hung Hsih, Chief consul from the Chinese consulate, and representatives from the Mayor's and the Governor's offices. 

 

--[Written by Antony Wong]

 

 

Go Back Up

 

 

 

 

 
Who are we Biographies Cable TV Fund Raising Past Events Contact us

© Asian American / Asian Research Institute   All Rights Reserved